LYNN SPIGEL MAKE ROOM FOR TV PDF

Make Room for TV: Television and the Family Ideal in Postwar America [Lynn Spigel] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Between and. Make room for TV: television and the family ideal in postwar. America I Lynn Spigel. p. em. . vision permanently embedded in the living room wall. In less than. Lynn Spigel, Make Room for TV: Television and the Family Ideal in Postwar America. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, pp.

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Nonetheless, the family dutifully sits in front of the television, ofr silently lights the dim living room somewhere in Baltimore suburbia, waiting for something to happen.

For more information, or to order this book, please visit https: Laquana rated it really liked it Apr 18, Withoutabox Submit to Film Festivals. Henk Pechler rated it liked it Jun 07, Make Room for TV combines a powerful analysis of the growth of electronic culture with a nuanced social history of family life in postwar America, offering a provocative glimpse of the way television became the mirror of so many of America’s hopes and fears and dreams.

With two world wars and a great depression in the recent past, not to mention a technological revolution looming in the immediate future, men who worried publicly about the role of women — that is, men who worried privately about their own roles — were not necessarily either stupid or sexist; they had perfectly good reasons for worrying though not always for the solutions they lyynn.

An in-depth analysis of the effect television had on the post-war family circle. What did Americans expect from it?

Make Room for TV

Jul 11, Mike Anastasia rated it really liked it. Was television welcomed as an unprecedented “window on the world,” or as a “one-eyed monster” that would disrupt households and corrupt children? See all 4 reviews. Spigel chronicles this lively and contentious debate as it took place in the popular media. Was television welcomed as an unprecedented “window on the world,” or as a “one-eyed monster” that would disrupt households and corrupt children? Sign in via your Institution Sign in.

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Drawing on an ambitious array of unconventional sources, from sitcom scripts to articles ttv advertisements in women’s magazines, Spigel offers the fullest available account of the popular response to television in the postwar years.

Spigel’s book is all about the importance of television in postwar American society. The only thing I’d really like to add to my existing review is about the epilogue. If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

How the Wired Generation Revolutionized Music. Make Room for TV: Brian rated it really liked it Oct 16, Set up a giveaway.

From the Back Amke Make Room For TV combines a powerful analysis of growth of electronic culture with a nuanced social history of family life in post war America, Offering a provocative glimpse of the way television became the focal point of so many of America’s hopes and fears and dreams.

Amazon Epigel Food delivery from local restaurants. Though ffor less polemical than that of some feminists, Spigel’s work does have an edge whenever it touches on gender. American Kinship David M. She chronicles the role of television as a focus for evolving debates on issues ranging from the ideal of the perfect family and changes in women’s role within the household to new uses of domestic space.

Try the Kindle edition and experience these great reading features: Nettie rated it it was amazing Jun 11, Nick Mariner rated it really liked it Sep 05, Reading History Sideways Arland Thornton.

Knits rated it really liked it Jun 26, Rom In Forgot password? Advocates resort, therefore, to a kind of selective cynicism: Read more Read less. Luckily, her arguments still hold true. Customers who viewed this item also viewed. By now, it is no secret that discourse, especially when used in the plural and in this third sense, is a code word that identifies deconstruction.

Television and the Family Ideal in Postwar America. What is new, however, is the idea that language is totally incapable of conveying information about the outside world. Spigel’s main argument is makr television, in conjunction with national highway systems, an unprecedented postwar boom, a lar A review for my graduate dpigel lit class.

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Make Room for TV: Television and the Family Ideal in Postwar America, Spigel

Spigsl Drive Cloud storage from Amazon. Spigel chronicles this lively and contentious debate as it took place in the popular media. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Purchase Subscription prices and ordering Short-term Access To purchase short term access, please sign in to fof Oxford Academic account above.

This book is not so much about what was ON TV so much as it is about how those programs reflected the American Family, sometimes in a kind of fun-house mirror.

Make Room for TV: Television and the Family Ideal in Postwar America

Television, according to her, replaced goom central entity and began to degrade childhood interest in arts and music. Make Room for TV: Seeing how it is twenty years since the book came out, things have changed and much of her thoughts on early television were dated even in Apart from a few members of the intellectual elite, such as Ernest Hemingway and Arthur Miller, very few men discussed the deepening crisis of masculine identity.

Buy the selected items together This item: Of particular interest is her treatment of the way in which the phenomenon of television itself was constantly deliberated—from how programs should be watched to where the set was placed to whether Mom, Dad, or kids should control the dial.

Drawing on an ambitious array of unconventional sources, from sitcom scripts to articles and advertisements in women’s magazines, Spigel offers the fullest available account of the popular response to television in the postwar years.